RICHPLANET.NET FORUM : WE ARE NOT ADMITTING NEW MEMBERS AT THIS POINT IN TIME.  THIS IS DUE TO PREVIOUS TROLLS ATTACKING THE FORUM.<br>
There is still no decision on whether new members will be added.  This can only happen when suitable moderators are in place, who are not easy to find for obvious reasons. www.richplanet.net community built on miniBB / RICHPLANET.NET FORUM : WE ARE NOT ADMITTING NEW MEMBERS AT THIS POINT IN TIME. THIS IS DUE TO PREVIOUS TROLLS ATTACKING THE FORUM.
There is still no decision on whether new members will be added. This can only happen when suitable moderators are in place, who are not easy to find for obvious reasons.
/

BANKING & ECONOMY

 Page:  ««  1  2  ...  4  5  6  7  8  ...  135  136  »» 
Starseed
Guest
#76 | Posted: 21 Nov 2010 10:56
Reply 
And another one sneaking in almost unreported:

ICB could call for Lloyds break-up
The Independent Commission on Banking (ICB) could call for a break-up of Lloyds Banking Group, one of its members warned on Friday as the Government backed body held its first public meeting.

Regulators are concerned that the retail banking market is controlled by too few players and Ms Spottiswoode took the opportunity to signal the ICB's intentions as she chaired the body's first public meeting at Leeds University Business School.

Peter Moizer, dean of Leeds Business School and a former member of the Competition Commission, made clear that he had been dismayed by the decision in late 2008 to waive competition concerns to allow Lloyds TSB to acquire HBOS.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/banksandfinance/8148370/ICB-could-cal l-for-Lloyds-break-up.html

Why don`t they just have one big bank and call it the 'Rothschild Bank' Or do we have that already, but it is slightly easier to fool the people if you hide it behind a few false fronts?
Starseed
Guest
#77 | Posted: 21 Nov 2010 11:27
Reply 
There is just so much going on with the economy and the Banking world at the moment that is happening -"Under the radar" as it were. A lot of these seem to be almost entirely interconnected with other National and International world events.

Will Britain have the next wave before or after the USA or before or after the collapse of the Euro? My guess is the slow death of the Euro. ? Any economists out there?
Starseed
Guest
#78 | Posted: 21 Nov 2010 11:30 | Edited by: Starseed
Reply 
100,000 British companies in financial trouble

A report by Begbies Traynor claims that upwards of 100,000 British companies are in serious financial trouble with over 58 billion of debt between them. There are also 50,000 other companies likely to be hit by UK government cutbacks which will make the situation even worse and potentially tip tens of thousands more companies over the edge. There is no doubt that beneath the surface there are many companies struggling to survive and any lurch downwards by the UK economy could have a catastrophic impact on the UK business arena.

http://www.financialadvice.co.uk/news/ukeconomy/90229-100000-british-companies-in-fin ancial-trouble.html

I did not see this on the BBC or Sky ?

Inflation in the UK continues to remain stubbornly high, unemployment in the UK is creeping ever higher and the economy is under major pressure. The higher unemployment rises the more pressure this places upon the welfare state and ultimately we could see many of the budget cuts introduced by the government negated by a massive increase in benefit payments.

I mentioned before a contact high up in a hospital where half of the mothers to be are foreign and they have to employ a full time interpreter at a huge cost on the wards. Who pays for that? Especially with the 'austerity' ?
Starseed
Guest
#79 | Posted: 21 Nov 2010 11:40
Reply 
"This is the reply from NHS Wakefield District to my request for information about how much it spent on interpereters and translation:

Thank you for your recent Freedom of Information request, I have liaised with my colleagues who have provided me with the response below.

The expenditure to date for Interpretation/Translation for NHS Wakefield District is 236,182.
If you have any queries please do not hesitate to contact me.
Updated figure: 7,178,625"

This is the reply from NHS Berkshire West about how much it spent on interpreters and translation:

Thank you for your request for information regarding the Trust's spend on interpreters and translation in 2008 which we received on 25 February 2009.

NHS Berkshire West spent a total of 21,461.41 on interpreters and translation in the calendar year 2008.

Updated figure: 6,425,310
=========================

And what do the BBC have to say? :

NHS 'failing those who don't speak English':

Caroline Wright, Royal College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology trainee, questions whether the NHS is offering a good enough service in providing interpreters when a patient does not speak English.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-11177316

Good old BBC
leprechaun
Member
#80 | Posted: 21 Nov 2010 12:29
Reply 
i would like to confirm that I am a different poster to Joe the only thing we have in common is that we have now both been personally abused by Starseed
leprechaun
Member
#81 | Posted: 21 Nov 2010 12:51
Reply 
Starseed:
WHOY? be gorrah? noo Oirish lilt in dat one? (LOL)

that is also quite offensive as it is racist and no doubt directed at me,
dark star
Member
#82 | Posted: 21 Nov 2010 14:54 | Edited by: dark star
Reply 
leprechaun:
that is also quite offensive as it is racist and no doubt directed at me,

No,what about me and the rest of the Ennis boys ??

Up the Banner......
Joe
Member
#83 | Posted: 21 Nov 2010 15:00
Reply 
leprechaun:
i would like to confirm that I am a different poster to Joe the only thing we have in common is that we have now both been personally abused by Starseed

Never mind leprechaun, he's not a happy person in life, and that is his punishment. This must be the reason why he takes his frustration out on innocent people on the forum (the coward way out).
dark star
Member
#84 | Posted: 21 Nov 2010 15:36
Reply 
I have a cunning plan my lord !

What is it now Dark Star ?

Well why dont you start a new thread called "Starseed,s room"

Put Starseed in his own room and if anyone wants to visit him there then he,ll be in his room.

If he wants fight and wreck his own room thats fine by me,I dont have to live in it....lol.

Also if your in a bad mood you can go into his room,give him some and get out to 'Health' or 'Disclosure' where he cant go....lol.
Joe
Member
#85 | Posted: 21 Nov 2010 15:46 | Edited by: Joe
Reply 


God: "That is a good idea my son - I wished I had thought of that - you do it, I'm too busy getting the Devil to prepare Hell for him!"
Starseed
Guest
#86 | Posted: 21 Nov 2010 18:11
Reply 
leprechaun
Member
#87 | Posted: 21 Nov 2010 19:49
Reply 
so you personally abuse posters,and use racism just to get attention,I really feel sorry for you,
Starseed
Guest
#88 | Posted: 21 Nov 2010 23:07 | Edited by: Starseed
Reply 
ImOverHere
Member
#89 | Posted: 22 Nov 2010 08:20 | Edited by: ImOverHere
Reply 
UK also going to "help" Ireland with bailout - must be screwing them on interest rate or UK banks are in too deep ( had snouts deep in Irish trough ) or both - definately not out of goodness of heart.

The Irish Prime Minister said that the situation was partly due to the "criminal action" of the banks - lets wait and see if there is any legal action against the banks and if there is why hasn't there been legal action in UK, not just a bottom smacking enquiry with scum like Fred Goodwin ( ex RBS boss ) still walking away with a massive great big fat pension.
dreamkatcher
Member
#90 | Posted: 22 Nov 2010 13:01
Reply 
BBC version. dk

22 November 2010 Last updated at 12:33 Share this pageFacebookTwitter ShareEmail Print Irish Republic offered 'around 7bn' support by UKClick to play
Click to play

Chancellor George Osborne: "We want the Irish economy to be stable."
Continue reading the main story
Global EconomyQ&A: Irish finances explained
Loan marks thaw in UK-Irish relations
What's at stake for the UK?
Portuguese fear EU debt contagion

The UK has offered a direct loan to the Irish Republic in addition to contributing to an international rescue, George Osborne has said.

Negotiations are continuing over terms but the chancellor told the BBC Ireland was a "friend in need" and it was in Britain's national interest to help.

Asked if the UK contribution would be about 7bn, he said "it's around that".

The Irish PM has confirmed they and the EU have agreed a financial rescue package.

The deal has led to the junior partner in the Irish Republic's governing coalition, the Green Party, to call for a general election in January to provide "political certainty" for the Irish people.

Mr Osborne, the UK Chancellor, is expected to make a statement about the UK commitment in the Commons later.

But he told BBC Radio 4's Today programme Britain, as a shareholder in the International Monetary Fund, was committed to being part of an international rescue of the Irish economy but it would also offer a bilateral loan: "That reflects the fact we are not part of the euro and don't want to be part of the euro.

"But Ireland is our very closest economic neighbour so I judged it to be in our national interest to be part of the international efforts to help the Irish."

Asked if the British commitment totalled 7bn, Mr Osborne said: "It's around that, it's in the billions not the tens of billions." But he said details of the British, IMF and Eurozone packages were still being worked out.

He said the direct bilateral loan recognised the "particular economic relationship" between Britain and Ireland - the rate of interest would be worked out as part of the package, he said.

'Quit the euro'

But there is some criticism of the proposals, which would require approval in a Commons vote, the BBC understands.

Conservative backbencher Douglas Carswell told the BBC: "We shouldn't be paying to help keep Ireland in the euro. If we are going to pay to solve this crisis, we should be helping to pay Ireland to quit the euro.

"Ireland's misery is only going to end when it has its own currency again. At a time of austerity, again we are paying vast sums to the European Union."

And fellow Tory MP John Redwood added: "I'm sure many of us will want to know why, how much, how long are we out of the money, what are the prospects of being repaid, what is the interest rate?"

Continue reading the main story
"
Start Quote
I told you so' is not much of an economic policy"
End Quote
George Osborne

Loan marks thaw in UK-Irish relations
Irish PM confirms EU rescue deal
Nick Robinson: 'A friend in need'
Is helping Ireland in UK interest?

Mr Osborne said he had been among those to oppose Britain's entry into the euro but added: "'I told you so' is not much of an economic policy. We've got to deal with the situation as we find it and it is in Britain's interests that we get some stability in Ireland, it's in Britain's interest that we are good neighbours."

He said the coalition government's efforts to tackle the deficit meant they were in a position to offer help - rather than being the recipients.

He said Britain was also part of a "European Union mechanism which will be used in this context" - the 60bn euro European Financial Stabilisation Mechanism - which he was "not particularly happy" about - but the previous government had signed up to it and now was not the time to "try and pull ourselves out of that".

However he said he was working to make sure Britain "was not part of a permanent bail out mechanism for the euro".

BBC political editor Nick Robinson said Mr Osborne and Prime Minister David Cameron had taken a decision at last week's G20 summit in Seoul that the UK would be ready to promise 7bn in loans as part of any Irish rescue plan.

The direct UK loan will be in the form of contingency loans which the government expects to see paid back. Sweden has also agreed to make a direct loan to the Irish.

BBC business editor Robert Peston said the Irish Republic's economy was important to the UK economy as it received a substantial amount of British exports and its banks played a big role in Northern Ireland.

The Royal Bank of Scotland had loaned 53bn into Northern Ireland, which was insured by taxpayers as RBS is a semi-nationalised bank, so if the Irish economy were to implode, that would generate big losses for RBS and the taxpayer, he said.

Taoiseach Brian Cowen said on Sunday that the amount and terms of the overall rescue deal would be negotiated in the coming days with the EU and the IMF.

Irish Finance Minister Brian Lenihan said the amount would be less than 100bn euros (85bn).

EU Finance Commissioner Olli Rehn, speaking in Brussels, said the loans would be provided to the Irish Republic over a three-year period.

The global financial crisis has dealt the Irish Republic a hard blow.

Once known as the Celtic Tiger for its strong economic growth - helped by low corporate tax rates - a property bubble burst, leaving the country's banks with huge liabilities and pushing up the cost of borrowing for them and the government.
 Page:  ««  1  2  ...  4  5  6  7  8  ...  135  136  »» 
Your reply
Bold Style  Italic Style  Image Link  URL Link 

   
» Username  » Password 
Only registered users are allowed to post here. Please enter your login/password details upon posting a message, or sign up first
TO JOIN THIS FORUM: WE ARE NOT ADMITTING NEW MEMBERS AT THIS POINT IN TIME. THIS IS DUE TO PREVIOUS TROLLS ATTACKING THE FORUM.
We may be considering adding new members on a "block basis". We will collect new member requests and then introduce a new batch. The new memebrs will be identifiable by a prefix in their username as a "new member". Anyone considered to be trolling or causing trouble will be immedialtey removed. To be put on the list please email richard@richplanet.net AND GIVE YOUR US NAME, A USERNAME, PASSWORD. I would imagine a new batch of new members will be added in January 2012.
 

Forums are powered by miniBB®